Programs

"Konincklycke Fantasien" - Consort Music for three Viols

Works by:  Thomas Lupo, John Coprario, Giovanni Bassano, William Daman, Orlando Gibbons, Henry Purcell, Matthew Locke & others.

Formation:  Treble, Tenor & Bass Viols

Genre:  Music from the 16th-17th century

 

Playing compositions out of the "Konincklycke Fantasien" - Royal Fantasies – collection, printed in Amsterdam in 1648, gathering works by John Coprario (ca.1575-1626), Thomas Lupo (ca.1570-1628), William Daman (died ca. 1590) and Orlando Gibbons (1583-1625), this concert aims to offer a vast range of different three-part consort pieces, from different great masters of different cultures in different styles. As we can see from this collection printed in the Low Countries, containing compositions from English masters, the variety and the interculturality of this specific genre was, even back then, flourishing. In this period of time, composing, printing or playing music also had a political connotation and influence. Transactions between cultures, countries, or courts were indeed very important, it was therefore common to exchange composition styles and skills through instrumental pieces and musical works. If we look at the biographies and especially the court connections of most of the composers of this era, it turns out that this specific music of the "Viol Consort" was a widespread and international habit.

The Musick-Roome of Mr. Mace

Works by:  Christopher Simpson, Giovanni Coperario, Thomas Tomkins,  John Jenkins, Richard Mico & others

Formation:  Treable, Tenor and Bass Viols, Theorbo and Organ

Genre:  17th century consort music

 

Thomas Mace describes in his treatise "Musicks Monument" how a proper room should look like for playing consort music.  He gives a detailed description  of  "The Musick Roome", where consort music should be performed. This inspired the group to build a program based on the works of composers mentioned by Mace in his work.

The Authors of such like Compositions, have been divers famous English Men, and Italians; [...] who in Their Late Time, were All Substantial, Able, and Profound Composing Masters in this Art, and have left their Works behind Them, as fit Monuments, and Patterns for Sober, and Wise Posterity, worthy to be Imitated, and Practiced. [...] –
Thomas Mace "Musick's Monument", 1676.  

Epitome Musical

Works by:  Hans Gerle, Diego Ortiz, Eustache du Caurroy, Tobias Hume, David Funck, Giovanni Legrenzi

Formation:  Tenor & Bass Viols, Violone - "Low-Pitch Consort"

Genre:  Music from the 16th-18th century

It is certain that in earlier times, when the practice of viol consort flourished, two kinds of "consorts" were in use. This is confirmed by numerous theoretical descriptions which clearly mention a set of smaller instruments, the "high consort," and a set of larger-bodied instruments, the "low consort". However, the first way of combining the instruments is the most usual practice among viol consorts today. According to the surviving repertoire, the "Low-Pitch Consort" was only common in Germany and Italy, possibly in France and Spain, but not in England.

"Epitome musical" is the title of  Phlippe Jambe de Fer's treatise printed in 1556, which inspired this program to embody the repertoire of the "Low-Pitch Consort." The aim of this program is to present the "less known" and nowadays "less practiced" repertoire of the viol consort. The pieces are chosen from different cultural areas in Europe, covering more than two centuries.  The program presents different styles of composition in general, as well as particular types of the consort repertoire. "Epitome Musical" includes both sacred and secular works, recalls the atmosphere of "Tafelmusik," and even includes sonata-like compositions of "Stylus Phantasticus."

This Merry Pleasant Spring

Works by:  Richard Mico, Alfonso Ferrabosco, John Blow, John Bennet, Thomas Tomkins & others

Formation:  Voice; Treble, Alto, Tenor & Bass Viols

Genre: 17th century consort music and "consort songs"

 

 

Consort Songs were common compositions in England through the late 16th and early 17th century. It is beleived that the genre was mainly ispired by the italian madrigals and the english "lute ayres". Consort songs are mostly five-part compositions where the first voice is taken over by a singer. The other voices accompany the singer with instruments, mosly with viols. The pieces of this program are put together from the most common english Fantasias and In Nomines by composers like Richard Mico, Thomas Tomkins, Alfonso Ferrabosco and Robert Parsons, enlighted by witty and sparkling consort songs, upon the subject of a "Merry Pleasant Spring", where birds sing, spring comes and happiness prevails.  

Works by:  William Byrd, John Buck, Thomas Tomkins, Richard Mico, Alfonso Ferrabosco & others

Formation:  Voice; Treble, Alto, Tenor & Bass Viols

Genre:  17th century consort music and "consort songs"

Consort Songs were common compositions in England through the late 16th and early 17th century. It is beleived that the genre was mainly ispired by the italian madrigals and the english "lute ayres". Consort songs are mostly five-part compositions where the first voice is taken over by a singer. The other voices accompany the singer with instruments, mosly with viols. The pieces of this program are put together from the most common english Fantasias and In Nomines by composers like William Byrd, John Buck, Thomas Tomkins, Alfonso Ferrabosco and Robert Parsons, alloying with tender consort songs of the topic Christmas: "...this day let man rejoyce and sweetly sing..."

...this day let man rejoyce and sweetly sing...
El Parnaso Español

Works by:  Francisco Guerrero, Pedro Ruimonte, Hernando de Cabezón, Antonio de Cabezón & Diego Ortiz

Formation:  Voices (Soprano & Bariton), Tenor & Bass Viols, Violone - "Low-Pitch Consort"

Genre:  17th century vocal and instrumental music from Spain

The concert program “El Parnaso Español” was named after a collection of musical works written by the Spanish composer Pedro Ruimonte, published in 1614 in Antwerpen, Belgium. Ruimonte was born in the Aragonese Zaragoza 1565, but he spent an important part of his career in the Low Countries, where he also published his most significant compositions. 1614 he returned to his hometown, where
he was active for the rest of his life as a teacher.
The “Siglo de Oro”, the so called Golden Age, was one of the most significant periods for the humanities in Spain. Not only in literature but also in fine arts such as music, architecture, painting and sculpture can be observed a meaningful development. Columbus just discovered America, Cervantes wrote the Quixote and a vast amount of magnificent music was written by Victoria, Morales and Guerrero.

© 2020 The Little Light Consort 

La Gamba - The Little Light Consort
00:00 / 00:00